Our Connection to Animals

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10151247520933901

This past year, I decided to stop riding my beloved horses. I understood that the use of bridles, bits, and spurs is contrary to the relationship I want with animals. This beautiful horse and girl show us what is possible between humans and animals when the relationship is based on love and respect.

“A deaf-mute girl on a horse that she has ridden for only THREE weeks!!, not to mention the song she picked out to dedicate to her deceased father! Listen to the announcer’s voice crack! The horse she is riding is not even hers; she is training it for a client and has had it only 20 days at the time of the ride shown here. Note that she rides without a saddle or halter and bit and (obviously) without voice commands. She is using the method used by North American Indians. When you think your voice can’t be heard I want each of you to watch this Video. She has no voice. She cannot hear. Yet she has persevered and achieved!”

Donna Artechi Perry, I honor you before Source for the beautiful example that you give us. hugs, pat

 

 

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13 Responses to Our Connection to Animals

  1. Lindy Lee says:

    Thank you so much for this post, NFT. In addition to watching this video you have here, everyone who would handle a horse should be required to read “Black Beauty” by Anna Sewell…

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  2. I rode my horses naturally throughout my childhood bareback and a bitless bridle/hackamore or just a halter with lead ropes. It is a wonderful way to become one with the horse, so to speak.

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    • Pat Cegan says:

      Yes, when one rides bareback, the horse and the person feel each other and can respond much easier. As I rode herd with the cowboys here, I used full riding gear as we often were in dangerous situations but I never felt that the way we handled our horses was right. My horses responded so easily to the slightest indication from me of what I wanted. However when herding a 100 cattle across miles of jungle and pasture, the horses would sometimes get spooked and controlling them was difficult. Still, I know that it is possible to work with more loving contact than we do. hugs, pat

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      • I was raised on a 1,000 acre cattle ranch during the 60’s. We had no electricity and raised or grew everything we ate. My father worked with the animals completely without cruelty. Although sadly, the cattle eventually became food, they roamed free, ate grass, their babies were allowed to stay with them to nurse and grow and they received the best attention if there were injuries or illness. The horses were family members and we depended upon them for much. When we drove the cattle from one area to another, the cutting horses all had to wear full tack, including bridles with bits. But my personal horses . . . never.
        Is so wonderful to share these stories with you. Thank you for taking the time here. ~Gerean

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  3. I actually use a bitless bridle with my mare and she loves it ! We do advanced dressage work with relaxation, and collection. You should look at the work of Klaus Ferdinand Hempfling “Dancing with Horses.” He works without all those entrapments.

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    • Pat Cegan says:

      Good for you. I have often wondered how horses feel about dressage, farm work, etc. I arrived at a point of questioning all the ways we use animals for our pleasure and needs without understanding what this means to them. At that point, I stopped riding, a huge loss for me, but one that I needed to make as I was unable to care for my horses alone and did not like the way they were treated in general here. I still do not know the answer to this but do know that we must love and respect all life as we are certainly all from our Creator. hugs, pat

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  4. catnipoflife says:

    Pat, this is an awesome story. I was about to reblog and did some research because I wanted to dedicate the posting to the recently departed author Sandra McLeod Humphrey. Her books (http://kidscandoit.com/kids-books.html) and blog (http://www.kidscandoit.com/blog/) motivate kids to be the best that they can be! She inspired and her spirit will continue to inspire all to DARE TO DREAM BIG (http://www.kidscandoit.com/blog/)! Visit her blog and become absorbed in the stories she wrote where success was the outcome of unimaginable adversity.

    In completing my research, I came upon Stacy Westfall’s website, which sheds a totally different light on the background of the video: http://stacywestfallhorseblog.com/2011/09/22/stacy-westfall-deaf-mute/

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    • Pat Cegan says:

      I have been interested for a long time about how horses can be trained to let us ride them in a more loving way. The American Indians have know about this always. To me, it is immaterial whether the young woman is deaf/mute. What she and that horse did together was nothing short of amazing, especially since it was not her horse. I had a horse that had a very unique bond with me so know the potential of that trust. Since I am 69 and with a total knee replacement, I decided that it was past my time to learn how to train him without the standard equipment. I also had no access to people who could teach me how to do this. So many people mistreat horses (and other animals) thinking one has to “dominate” to get their respect. That simply is not true. My horses were acutely sensitive to the needs of the handicapped children in my equine therapy program. Most were former horses used by our cowboys and had never been around a child. It was astounding how they immediately acted differently with the children. We have much to learn from the animals in our lives, both the domestic and the wild animals around us. I live on a wildlife preservation and have been protected several times by animals in the floresta. Hugs, pat

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      • catnipoflife says:

        Thank you, Pat, for your wonderful reply. I was somewhat hesitant in sending the link but it was for FYI only. The video is amazing and the way she handled the horse with love definitely showed immensely! I do hope you get a chance to visit Sandra’s site. She, like you do now, exhibited compassion beyond words. I have always loved horses but never was fortunate enough to live in a situation where I could have one of my own. They are truly magnificent animals.

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      • Pat Cegan says:

        Yes, I did visit her site and will visit the others tomorrow. Thank you for the links and comments. You need never be hesitant about posting here. If you step on my toes, I probably needed it. Besides, there is always the magic delete button. lol, write away, dear friend, I always welcome your comments. hugs, pat

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  5. Reblogged this on Living and Lovin and commented:
    not sure if she is really deaf some say no but love how she directs another s horse through the competition

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